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Outline Persuasive Essay Kids

I take my dog Oskar to work with me nearly every day. He rides in a trailer that I tow behind my bike 2.5 miles uphill to the Kibin office. I’m lucky that I work for a place that allows dogs.

Other dog companions aren’t so fortunate. Shouldn’t responsible dog owners be allowed to bring their beloved furballs anywhere they wish?

But, this post isn’t about teaching you to persuade your boss to let you bring your dog to work (although that would be cool). No, the goal of this blog post is to teach you how to write a persuasive essay outline.

In this post, I’ll break down the components of a good persuasive essay. I’ll also set you up with a downloadable outline template that you can use when you are ready to persuade your teacher to give you a better grade in English class this semester.

What is a Persuasive Essay Anyway?

The goal of a persuasive essay is to convince your readers that your viewpoint is the right viewpoint. In a persuasive paper, you pull out all the stops to say, “It’s my way or the highway!”

Unlike argumentative essays, where facts reign supreme, you don’t necessarily have to use researched, absolute facts to support your persuasive paper.

The goal of your persuasive paper is to persuade by any means necessary. If that involves including emotional anecdotes or stories instead of facts, that’s fine.

Don’t believe me? Ask any politician. When it comes to powers of persuasion, the facts don’t necessarily matter.

While including actual facts and evidence can be an effective way to persuade, it’s okay to play dirty in a persuasive essay. Make your readers laugh, cry, or quake in fear as long as it gets them to believe that what you are saying is true.

That said, you can’t go in and write your essay without any direction. To really persuade someone in your persuasive essay, you have to be smoooooth. You have to have finesse. To be smooth and finesseful (not a word, by the way), you should start with an outline.

Here’s an example of a persuasive essay outline:

Persuasive Essay Outline Intro

First, it’s important to select a topic that you can take a stand for.

Let’s say we’re writing about animal rights. I’m not talking about your typical “people shouldn’t hurt animals” essay. I’m talking about bestowing actual human rights on to my favorite animal: dogs.

1. Write a hook. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again. Always start your introduction with a strong hook. Make your audience want to read your essay.

For example, “Your dog is smarter than your baby, and more useful and loyal too. Plus, your dog will never, ever turn into an angsty teenager. If dogs are such good people, why don’t they have rights?”

Define your audience. This is a sentence or two that helps your reader define himself as being a member of your target audience. In my example, I’m specifically speaking to dog owners who live in Portland, Oregon.

For example, “For all Portland dog companions who have ever been turned away from a restaurant, disallowed access to transit, or rejected from a public park, it’s time to stand up for your pet’s rights—and your rights too!”

2. Present your thesis statement. Here is where you get to the meat of your persuasive essay and define the exact viewpoint that you want your audience to adopt.

Much as you would in an argumentative essay, you must take a stance on your topic. No wishy-washy “eh, I could go either way” stuff allowed.

Pick a side. Stick to it. Defend it to the end!

For example, “The dogs of Portland deserve the same rights and privileges as granted to our youngest humans, such as the right to visit restaurants, ride buses, walk off-leash, and go to the cinema so long as they are accompanied by a responsible human companion.”

Persuasive Essay Outline Body Paragraphs

The exact number of body paragraphs you include will depend on the parameters of your assignment and your topic. A bigger assignment and/or topic will require more reasons and paragraphs. A smaller assignment and/or topic will require fewer reasons and paragraphs. For the purpose of this blog post, I’m including three example reasons.

Each reason you come up with can be emotionally charged, logically irrefutable, or ethically binding—so long as it’s persuasive. In addition, each persuasive reason you offer should be supported by a fact or an example.

Body Paragraph 1

  • Reason #1. Portland dogs are as smart as young children and often make for more polite companions.
  • Fact or example 1: Dogs are capable of learning up to 250 words and can easily go with the flow of human interactions.
  • Fact or example 2: Dogs are quieter and less disruptive than the average two-year-old human.

Body Paragraph 2

  • Reason #2. Portland dogs should be able to walk leash-free if they are accompanied by their human companions; in most cases, wearing a leash is unnecessary.
  • Fact or example 1: Dogs can be easily trained to walk alongside their human companions without a leash or restraint.
  • Fact or example 2: In a recent survey, 65% of Portland dog owners said that walking a dog on a leash is more of a hassle than walking a dog leash-free.

Body Paragraph 3

  • Reason #3. More rights for Portland dogs means more rights for Portland’s dog companions.
  • Fact or example 1: Dog companions will have more choices of places where they can spend time with friends and family without having to leave beloved pets behind.
  • Fact or example 2: Dog companions won’t have to deal with the trouble of hiring a dog-walker while at work or a pet-sitter for short weekend getaways.

Persuasive Essay Outline Conclusion

Now that you have outlined your reasons and supporting facts and examples, it’s time to seal the deal in your essay’s conclusion. Your conclusion should contain the following important components:

1. Brief summary. Remind your audience of why this topic is important.

For example, “Dogs all across Portland are being unfairly denied the basic right to accompany their human companions to public places. It’s time for Portland dog owners to stand up for their furry friends.”

2. Benefits to the reader. Explain how acting on this issue will benefit your audience.

For example, “Not only will taking a stand for your canine benefit dogs everywhere, it will also benefit you. Next time you want to take a weekend away, ride the bus to work, or enjoy a matinee, you won’t have to worry about who will take care of your dog while you are away. This issue is about your rights as a dog companion too.”

3. Acall to action. What do you want your readers to do now that they’ve (hopefully) subscribed to your viewpoint on the topic?

For example, “Vote ‘yes’ on Portland City Ballot initiative 14 this election. It’s time to stand up for the rights of our most loyal friends.”

Downloadable Persuasive Essay Outline Template and Additional Resources

Now that you have a better idea of what it takes to create a persuasive essay outline, go forth and persuade the world!

I created the above visual outline using the online mind-mapping app at text2mindmap. It’s a great resource to brainstorm your persuasive essay topic, or create a visual persuasive essay outline.

Here is another useful persuasive essay outline builder that I found during my research.

Finally, here is a Persuasive Essay Outline Template (Word doc) I created just for you.

Feel free to use it to get started.

Once your writing is complete, be sure to have an editor review your essay for you. After all, you don’t want all your preparation to be for nothing.

Good luck!

Psst... 98% of Kibin users report better grades! Get inspiration from over 500,000 example essays.

The persuasive speech outline templates are usually very similar and consist of 5 simple steps you need to follow. Here are these steps:

1. Catching the readers' attention

It doesn't matter whether you're going to read the speech in front of a large audience or simply give this paper to your professor. Either way, your outline for persuasive speech has to start with something catchy enough.

Don't use cliches, however. Instead, try using an interesting fact, a controversial sentence, a joke (but be careful with that one), and so on. And remember about the persuasive speech outline format, especially if you're going to hand it in, as it can influence your grade.

2. Acknowledging the problem

So your goal is to persuade the audience. But why exactly do they need to be persuaded? Why the topic you've chosen is so special and what is the problem that needs to be discussed?

Any good persuasive speech outline example contains the problem that has to be solved or a need that has to be fulfilled. Your goal is to state this problem or need and to present it to the audience so they will believe that something has to be done about it.

Simply stating the problem is not enough, however. Even at this point, you need to back up your point of view with some arguments or (and) statistical data, thoroughly explaining the consequences of doing nothing about the problem.

3. Solve the problem

While you might not be able to solve the problem immediately and forever, you might still be able to offer a good solution. That's the main point of writing a persuasive speech - you need to show that you not only know about certain things but that you're able to do something about them.

In order to do so, explain the solution clearly. Make sure to use some examples too. Back up your opinion with facts and try to sound calm and confident. Of course, there's a possibility that you're going to face some questions or counter-arguments at this point, so prepare yourself to answer them or to defend your point of view. While there's no need to include the answers to possible questions into persuasive speech outline, you can still do so if it makes it easier for you.

4. Visualize the future

Visualization is one of the best and the most effective examples. By offering some visualization of the future you'll be able to increase the influence of your persuasive speech on the audience.

In order to do so, include two possible visualizations in the persuasive speech outline: a positive one (what will happen if your solution will be implemented in real life) and a negative one (what will happen if no actions will be taken). Don't describe both solutions in details (you'll be able to do it later during your persuasive speech writing), but make sure to include at least a few facts into the outline.

5. Call to action

Every good speech or paper writing needs a powerful ending. You need to call the audience to a certain action in order for your persuasive speech to have the desired effect on them. Be sure to be concise yet impressive here. Use strong words and provide direct guidelines.

That's all you need to know to craft a strong persuasive speech outline and to move on to the writing process. If any of the points above seem unclear, check any sample persuasive speech outline for additional guidelines.

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